Warren Arbuckle, originally from Victoria, BC, Canada, has 25 years experience in Japan and is fluent in Japanese. Warren is president of Focus Cubed Inc., a consulting and corporate training firm based in Asia. He has spent the last 12 years focusing on business innovation and managing projects including IT, medical education, sales team development, accreditation for global medical standards, and collaborative relationship development.

Warren has a black belt in judo and is a certified Project Management Professional (PMP). He is experienced in managing and facilitating multi-cultural, multi-functional project teams. Accredited by the Project Management Institute (PMI) as a Registered Education Provider (R.E.P.), Focus Cubed Inc. provides training for PMI members working towards recertification.

Since 1998, Warren has been providing consulting services along with customized training program development and instruction, in both English and Japanese, for sales, project & risk management, strategic solution development, and business innovation.

Warren’s long experience Asia and Japan have allowed him to live and work in a multi-cultural setting, honing his communicative and collaborative facilitation skills.

In 2008, he published his first book in Japanese, entitled ‘Business Mapping’ on innovative problem solving for teams. He is currently working on his second book, based on his project management course, entitled Project Mapping that focuses on enhancing team communication and collaboration.

Clients include:

  • NTT Docomo
  • Fuji Xerox
  • Eli Lily Pharmaceuticals
  • Temple University Japan
  • Hertz Asia Pacific
  • Barclay’s Capital
  • Dell
  • Cisco
  • EMC
  • Hewlett Packard

Professional Affiliations:

  • Project Management Institute (pmi.org)
  • American Creativity Association (amcreativityassoc.org)
  • Facilitation Association of Japan (faj.or.jp)
  • Canadian Chamber of Commerce, Japan (cccj.or.jp)
Warren Arbuckle PMP

'Leveraging MindManager for project management is the natural evolution of early visualization starting from the Gantt chart.'